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Gone to Green Market

What’s hiding in your makeup?

If you’re looking to source natural, cosmetic products, tracking ingredient sources can sometimes be tricky. What’s hiding in your makeup? Let’s take a look. Here are 10 common ingredients derived from animal products.

Lanolin

Lanolin

Animal derivation: sheep wool

Vegan alternative: Good alternatives include plant oils such as coconut oil and olive oil or butters such as shea butter and coconut butter.

Cosmetic use: Lanolin is an emollient used to moisturize and soften. In cosmetics, you will commonly find lanolin used in lip balms, lipsticks and lip glosses.

Ingredients to watch out for: Lanolin, wool fat, wool wax, lanolin alcohol, lanolin acid, aliphatic alcohol, cholesterin, ester alcohol, isopropyl lanolate, laneth, lanogene, Lanosterols, triterpene alcohols, lanthionine.

Collagen

Collagen

Animal derivation: animal tissue, bone, skin, or ligaments – often from cows

Vegan alternative: soya protein, almond oil or alma oil

Cosmetic use: Collagen is often used as an anti-aging and lip-plumping ingredient. Watch for it in skincare products and lipsticks.

Ingredients to watch out for: collagen, collagen peptides, hydrolyzed collagen, soluble collagen

Keratin

Keratin

Animal derivation: Keratin is made from the hooves, feathers, hair and horns of animals.

Vegan alternative: Vegan alternatives to keratin include plant based proteins such as rice and wheat, soya protein and almond oil

Cosmetic use: Keratin is commonly used in nail polishes to build and strengthen the nails.

Ingredients to watch out for: keratin, arginine, serine, threonine

Beeswax

Beeswax

Animal derivation: bees (and bee byproducts)

Vegan alternative: plant waxes and soy waxes

Cosmetic use: Beeswax is used in a variety of cosmetic products to keep emulsions from separating. Watch for it in lip balm, lipstick, lip gloss, eye shadow, eye liner, blush and mascara.

Ingredients to watch out for: beeswax, cera alba, cera flava

Glycerin

Glycerin

Animal derivation: animal fat

Vegan alternative: vegetable glycerin

Cosmetic use: Glycerine is frequently used in perfumes as a humectant and in skincare products to improve the skin’s feeling of moisture content and smoothness.

Ingredients to watch out for: glycerin(e), glycerol,glycerides, glyceryls, glycreth-26, polyglycerol

Elastin

Elastin

Animal derivation: animal fat

Vegan alternative: vegetable glycerin

Cosmetic use: Glycerine is frequently used in perfumes as a humectant and in skincare products to improve the skin’s feeling of moisture content and smoothness.

Ingredients to watch out for: glycerin(e), glycerol,glycerides, glyceryls, glycreth-26, polyglycerol

Carmine

Carmine

Animal derivation: Carmine is produced from crushed female cochineal insects.

Vegan alternative: beet juice, alkanet root

Cosmetic use: This colorant is often used in lipsticks, blushes and nail polish.

Ingredients to watch out for: carmine, cochineal, carminic acid, natural red 4, E120, and C.I. 75470

Urea

Urea

Animal derivation: Urea can be derived from horse urine; this was more typical in the past. Today, it is most often made synthetically.

Vegan alternative: Vegan alternatives to urea include: synthetic urea, shea butter, jojoba oil, coconut oil, almond oil, argan oil, avocado oil, and other plant-based skin conditioning products that contain vitamin E.

Cosmetic use: It can be used as a moisturizer and skin softener or as a preservative in skincare and hair products.

Ingredients to watch out for: imidazolidinyl urea, uric acid

Guanine

Guanine

Animal derivation: Guanine is a crystalline substance obtained from fish scales.

Vegan alternative: Some vegan alternatives to guanine can include leguminous plants, synthetic pearl, or aluminum and bronze particles.

Cosmetic use: It is used in cleanser, lipstick and nail polish to produce a pearly, iridescent effect. It can also be used to cover blemishes.

Ingredients to watch out for: guanine, pearl essence

Squalene

Squalene

Animal derivation: Squalene is derived from shark liver oil.

Vegan alternative: Instead of squalene, use products with vegetable oils.

Cosmetic use: Squalene is highly regarded for its restorative moisturizing properties and is commonly used as a lubricant in creams and lotions. You’ll find it in moisturizer, foundation, lipstick and eye shadow.

Ingredients to watch out for: squalene, squalane

It can be surprising to learn how many cosmetic and skin care ingredients are derived from animal products. A true vegan lifestyle extends far beyond the kitchen. We encourage you to stay on the path…and to check your cosmetic labels next time you pull out your makeup bag!

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